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Home > NOTEWORTHY DINING > New York City Noteworthy Dining > Aretsky's Patroon > Space
Space
    
   
Located on 46th Street between Lexington and Third Avenues stands a low-level white brownstone amidst a sea of skyscrapers in New York's Midtown Manhattan. Emblazoned on the front of the brownstone are the words "Aretsky's Patroon" illuminated elegantly from above. Along with those words, a flag at the far end of the restaurant indicates your arrival, just in case you've walked past the beautiful foliage and the several textured windows, which are framed in black and help differentiate the building from the others on the street around it. Open the door and you'll enter what's not merely a vestibule, but rather a full-fledged room, prior to entering the main dining room. Toward the left is the hostess station and toward the right the coat check. Past the coat check are stairs leading to the upstairs private dining rooms and the roof. The reception area has two comfortable, cream-colored armless chairs -- which are made of chrome and upholstered in leather -- surrounding a vase filled with a tall arrangement of flowers and greenery. Opaque domes provide muted light that highlights impressive photographs (described in more detail in our Appealing Highlights section) while more black-framed windows offer a glimpse into the main dining room.

   
     
    
Upon entering Aretsky's Patroon through its two wood-framed glass doors, you'll make your way into the main dining room, which is long yet spacious. Directly to the right as you enter is a wall of mirrors with a sunset-hued leather banquette and three tables for two. Directly after that, in front of you, is the bar area. Toward the left, meanwhile, are two long rows of tables along a caramel-colored upholstered wall, where there is seating at both free-standing tables and banquettes. The main dining room is really set into three nook-like areas. The portion toward 46th Street has three semicircular banquettes and two rectangular tables. The restaurant is very proud -- and rightly so -- of its own museum-quality photographs, which decorate the wall in this area and include works titled "52nd Street at Night," "Apollo 11" and "A View of Lower Manhattan From the Brooklyn Piers." The main area, in the middle of the dining room, is somewhat separated by a dark wooden column; it holds three tables along the wall and three others away from it. Photographs here include "The Apollo Spaceflight Training Suits" and "Frank Sinatra's Pizza Party with Lauren Bacall & James Dean." Further creating a separation between the nooks are small abstract metallic structures sitting between the banquettes. If you step further through the dining room you'll see three banquettes on the left and several tables against the opposite wall on the right, prior to arriving at the chef's table. Photographs decorating this area are perhaps some of the most impressive for hard core New Yorkers; they include "The Empire State Building" and "12 Minutes at Rush Hour in Grand Central Terminal," which is actually a series of three photographs. Ceilings in the main dining room are white and made of flat pieces of wood that create a recessed effect. Lighting comes courtesy of opaque domes, which provide indirect light, as well as from panels of light behind which sits a mesh box affixed to the walls. The entire room is airy, breezy and has a modern American effect to it. Tables are more than generous in size and also are generously spaced. You feel as if you've walked into the epitome of the New York business lunch.

   
     
      
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