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Home > NOTEWORTHY DINING > Santa Monica Noteworthy Dining > The Lobster > Space
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The Lobster has a long history in Santa Monica, Calif. Originally opened in 1923, the 30-seat seafood shack was a popular stop for locals. Unfortunately, in 1985 the restaurant closed. While local restaurateur Warren Roberts wanted to revitalize The Lobster, Mike Nathan, the property's owner, wasn't convinced. Still, Roberts wouldn't stop until he persuaded Nathan. In 1996, nearly 10 years after the restaurant had closed, he did. With Nathan on board, one would assume the project found calmer seas in the years ahead. In 1998, however, with construction already well underway, the city of Santa Monica decided that it wanted to invoke its ability to buy the historic property. Local residents and supporters fought the city, though, and won, paving the way for The Lobster to reopen in its present form in July 1999. Howard Laks was the architect behind the renovation, and his upscale vision, which included significantly more seating and sophistication than the previous space, was without question well received.

   
     
    
The Lobster is located on Ocean Avenue at the entrance to the Santa Monica pier. Despite its picturesque location, however, the restaurant doesn't exactly look spectacular-upon first glance, that is. As you are looking directly at the main entrance, the facility looks like a white box with three double glass doors framed in light wood, above which "The Lobster" is written in red. Blue awnings cover each set of doors and there are several steps to get to the main entrance. Railings surround the structure and atop the building is an American flag. All told, it looks like a pretty average place. But if you look to the sides, you'll see a much more beautiful story. The restaurant is actually raised above open-air parking on concrete columns. A majority of the walls are glass and lush greenery on the street level surrounds them. The structure is rectilinear, but the side that is parallel to the oceanfront is curvilinear. Ivy adorns the bottom of the walls and beautiful pink flowers decorate the concrete wall that surrounds the parking lot.

   
     
      
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